Quebec village refuses to remove swastika-emblazoned anchor from park

The municipality of Pointe-des-Cascades, Que., says it won’t remove an anchor adorned with a swastika in a neighbourhood park because the piece has historical significance.

Last Thursday, Corey Fleischer, the founder of Erasing Hate, was called to Parc Saint-Pierre in the small village west of Montreal to remove the swastika.

Fleischer is known for patrolling the Montreal area to scrub away hateful graffiti.

But as he went to paint over the swastika, Fleischer was confronted by the mayor, who called the provincial police to have him removed from the park.

Corey Fleischer

Corey Fleischer has earned a reputation as a graffiti removal specialist. His attempt to paint over the swastika on the anchor was stopped. (Corey Fleischer )

On Tuesday, the municipality said in a statement the anchor predates the Second World War and was recovered 25 years ago by divers, making it a piece of local history.

According to the statement, the anchors belonged to a merchant vessel.

“The village of Pointe-des-Cascades does not endorse Nazism. Our village has a beautiful community and family spirit, and creates events that bring people together,” said Gilles Santerre, mayor of Pointe-des-Cascades.

He has committed to placing a more descriptive plaque next to the anchor to clarify why it is there.

‘It’s no longer a sign of peace’

But that response doesn’t quell the fears of Fleischer, who says the anchor should be relegated to a museum, out of public view.

“There is zero place for any swastikas in any public parks, right across the world,” he told CBC Montreal’s Homerun.

Fleischer acknowledged the swastika was originally a religious icon, representing good luck, but said that since WW II, its meaning has been subverted by its connection to Nazism.

“It is no longer a sign of peace. It is no longer a sign of joy.”

Ontario man found dead on Appalachian Trail hike

Police say Gerald Gabon may have died after a medical episode

The Associated Press Posted: Aug 22, 2017 1:01 PM ET Last Updated: Aug 22, 2017 1:01 PM ET

Authorities say the body of a Canadian man has been found along the Appalachian Trail in Maine.

WABI-TV reports that the body of 55-year-old Gerald Gabon of Milton, Ont., was found Sunday evening by another hiker along the trail in Wyman Township in Franklin County.

The Maine Warden Service says Gabon was hiking alone and may have suffered a medical episode.

The section of the Appalachian Trail is rough, with rugged parts and no cellphone reception.

A helicopter was sent to retrieve the body.

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‘Tremendous bravery and fortitude’: Solemn ceremony pays tribute to Dieppe raid’s fallen

Rain lashed down at a solemn ceremony in Ottawa today to mark the 75th anniversary of one of Canada’s bloodiest battles of the Second World War.

Shielding himself with an umbrella, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau paid tribute to those who fought and died with “grit and valour” in the Dieppe raid and to the parents, siblings, spouses and children who were left heartbroken.

Of the 5,000 Canadians who landed at Dieppe on Aug. 19, 1942, 907 were killed, 586 wounded and almost 2,000 were taken prisoner.

Dieppe 75th Anniversary

Veteran Stan Edwards, centre, lays a wreath on behalf of veterans during a ceremony marking the anniversary of the Dieppe raid. (Justin Tang/The Canadian Press)

Trudeau said at that time, boys were forced to quickly become men — men of “tremendous bravery and fortitude, dedicated to country.”

“We often learn more about ourselves in our losses than our victories. We grow, we persevere, we learn hard truths,” Trudeau said. “The Dieppe raid was a devastating engagement for Canadian troops, and their loved ones back home. But, ultimately, our soldiers learned lessons that would help secure their victory two years later on the beaches of Normandy.

“For those lessons, we look back on the Dieppe raid with unshakable pride.”

Trudeau: ‘it wasn’t rain it was bullets’1:20

Then Trudeau put down his umbrella to note that it was “fitting” that the assembled crowd would be feeling uncomfortable as their suits, hair and shoes got wet.

“I think it’s all the more fitting that we remember on that day in Dieppe the rain wasn’t rain, it was bullets,” he said, departing from his prepared remarks.

“As we stand here 75 years later with this duty and this act of remembrance, it is all too fitting. Today and every day, we recommit ourselves to the pursuit of peace and justice for all. Today and all days, we remember.” 

Many of the participants wore plastic ponchos and carried poppy umbrellas.

The ceremony included readings of the Act of Remembrance by Dieppe veterans David Lloyd Hart and Maurice Leblanc.

Dieppe veteran delivers Act of Remembrance2:35

Hundreds of firefighters battling largest wildfire ever recorded in B.C.

Hundreds of firefighters and dozens of aircraft are working to contain the largest wildfire ever recorded in British Columbia’s history.

Nineteen wildfires have merged in the province’s Interior, creating a single blaze that’s estimated to be more than 467,000 hectares in size, according to fire information officer Kevin Skrepnek with the B.C. Wildfire Service.

The massive Plateau fire, which stretches 130 kilometres from one end to the other, is located on the Chilcotin Plateau, 60 kilometres west of Quesnel and 60 kilometres northwest of Williams Lake.

Google Maps: Williams Lake, B.C.

It was created by the merging of the Chezacut, Tautri, Bishop’s Bluff, Baezaeko, Wentworth Creek, Arc Mountain, and other wildfires. The first of those was discovered on July 7 and the cause is listed as “under investigation.”

The fire is now so big the wildfire management branch has set up two incident command teams to co-ordinate the firefighting efforts of more than 400 firefighters, 25 helicopters and dozens of pieces of heavy equipment

Previously, the biggest wildfire in B.C. history was a 220,000 hectare blaze that burned in the northeastern part of the province in 1958.

Slow progress despite efforts

Skrepnek says crews are making good progress on the fire, but because of its size, it’s expected to continue burning for weeks.

“Just given the sheer scale of this fire, you know it is going to be active for some time to come and it’s going to be quite some time before we would be even close to calling it contented or calling it under control.”

There are no major communities affected by the blaze but several smaller rural communities in the Cariboo region are under evacuation orders.   

There have been 1,031 fires in the province since April 1, burning over 900,000 hectares of land, and making 2017 the worst wildfire season on record.  The previous record was set in 1958, when 855,000 hectares burned.

Last week the B.C. government extended the state of emergency covering the entire province until Sept. 1.
    

How doctors are sparing patients from heart tests they don’t need

Echocardiogram

An echocardiogram, a common diagnostic test done on individuals such as this one in Los Angeles, may not always appropriately improve a patient’s care. So doctors are working to reduce unnecessary use of them. (Mario Anzuoni/Reuters)

Doctors ordered fewer unnecessary heart tests after they watched an educational video and received monthly feedback reports, according to a new randomized study in Ontario and the U.S.

Echocardiograms are ultrasounds of the heart and one of the most common diagnostic test, cardiologists say. Clinicians order the non-invasive tests unnecessarily at times, leading to false positive findings that can snowball into more invasive tests and potentially harm to patients.

It’s one example groups such as the Canadian Institute for Health Information and Choosing Wisely Canada have focused on reducing the more than one million unnecessary medical tests and treatments ordered each year across the country that don’t contribute to patient care. 

Echocardiograms allow physicians to visualize heart function, such as watch the organ beat, check if a valve is leaking or look for damage after a heart attack. 

Now Dr. Sacha Bhatia, a cardiologist at Women’s College Hospital and Toronto’s University Hospital Network, and his team have tested a way to reduce unnecessary echocardiograms, at least in the short term. The tests now cost the health-care system in Ontario more than $190 million a year, he said. 

In Monday’s issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Bhatia and his co-authors reported the results of their trial, called Echo Wisely. The researchers randomly assigned 196 physicians in Toronto, Kingston, Ont., and Boston to receive an educational video and individualized monthly feedback from an app or no change. 

The investigators adapted existing guidelines on ordering tests for the app. Then trained research assistants checked whether tests were considered appropriate based on the guidelines and information from patients’ medical charts. To prevent bias in the analysis, the assistants didn’t know which group the participating physicians were in . 

Better technology useful to patient?

Cardiologists and primary care providers who received the support had a lower rate of unnecessary testing (8.6 per cent) compared with those who did not (11.1 per cent), Bhatia and his team said.

“Often times, because our technology has gotten better and better and better, we tend to see things that may or may not be useful to the patient,” Bhatia said in an interview.

Bhatia said he didn’t realize the extent to which the feedback would make a difference, and it got him thinking about how physicians rarely receive any.

“[Telling] people how they’re doing can help drive improvements in performance even when it’s not tied to any incentives.”

Bhatia called the individual feedback and anonymous findings of doctors’ peers a powerful tool to change their behaviour.

While physicians often strive for high grades and are often motivated to improve their performance, Bhatia acknowledged that once feedback stops, a U.S. study suggests they revert back.

There’s been a dramatic increase in health-care spending on services that haven’t been shown to improve patient outcomes, which is driving the push to decrease inappropriately ordered tests, Dr. Randolph Martin of Emory University Medical School in Atlanta, Ga., said in a journal editorial published with the study.

Martin said we need “simple and easy” ways to educate those who order tests inappropriately, such as those aimed at the top culprits of routine surveillance.

For instance, Martin said, automated analytical software could incorporate artificial intelligence and machine learning into electronic medical records to notify those who ordered the test whether one has been done recently and to question whether it will improve a patient’s care. 

Since the study participants were mainly from teaching hospitals, Bhatia expects the findings would apply elsewhere in Canada.

It’s not clear if it would generalize to doctors working at community hospitals or in private offices where many of these tests are done. The long-term sustainability also needs to be studied.

Overall, it’s estimated that 30 per cent of testing in Canada may be unnecessary. 

Doctors cut back on unnecessary tests with feedback, Canadian cardiologist finds

Echocardiogram

An echocardiogram, a common diagnostic test done on individuals such as this one in Los Angeles, may not always appropriately improve a patient’s care. So doctors are working to reduce unnecessary use of them. (Mario Anzuoni/Reuters)

Doctors ordered fewer unnecessary heart tests when they watched an educational video and received monthly feedback reports, according to a new randomized study in Ontario and the U.S.

Echocardiograms are ultrasounds of the heart and one of the most common diagnostic test, cardiologists say. It’s one reason that groups such as the Canadian Institute for Health Information and Choosing Wisely Canada have focused on reducing the more than one million unnecessary medical tests and treatments ordered each year across the country that don’t contribute to patient care. 

Echocardiograms allow physicians to visualize heart function, such as watch the organ beat, check if a valve is leaking or look for damage after a heart attack. But the noninvasive heart test can also lead clinicians to order unnecessarily at times, leading to false positive findings that can snowball into more invasive tests and potentially harm to patients.

Now Dr. Sacha Bhatia, a cardiologist at Women’s College Hospital and Toronto’s University Hospital Network and his team have tested a way to reduce unnecessary echocardiograms, at least in the short term.

In Monday’s issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Bhatia and his co-authors reported the results of their trial, called Echo Wisely, that randomly assigned 196 physicians in Toronto, Kingston, Ont. and Boston to receive an educational video and individualized monthly feedback from an app or no change.

Better technology useful to patient?

Cardiologists and primary care providers who received the support had a lower rate of unnecessary testing (8.6 per cent) compared with those did not (11.1 per cent), Bhatia and his team said.

“Often times, because our technology has gotten better and better and better, we tend to see things that may or may not be useful to the patient,” Bhatia said in an interview.

Bhatia said he didn’t realize the extent to which the feedback would make a difference and got him thinking about how physicians rarely receive any.

“[Telling] people how they’re doing can help drive improvements in performance even when it’s not tied to any incentives.”

Bhatia called the individual feedback and anonymous findings of doctors’ peers a powerful tool in changing behaviour.

While physicians often strived for high grades and are often motivated to improve their performance, Bhatia acknowledged that once feedback stops, a U.S. study suggests they revert back.

There’s been a dramatic increase in health care spending on services that haven’t been shown to improve patient outcomes, which is driving the push to decrease inappropriately ordered tests, Dr. Randolph Martin of Emory University Medical School in Atlanta, Ga., said in a journal editorial published with the study.

Martin said we need “simple and easy” ways to educate those who order tests inappropriately, such as those aimed at the top culprits of routine surveillance.

For instance, Martin said, automated analytical software could incorporate artificial intelligence and machine learning into electronic medical records to notify those who ordered the test whether one has been done recently and to question whether it will improve a patient’s care. 

Since the study participants were mainly from teaching hospitals, Bhatia expects the findings would apply elsewhere in Canada. It’s not clear if it would generalize to doctors working at community hospitals or in private offices where many of these tests are done. The long-term sustainability also needs to be studied.

Overall, it’s estimated that 30 per cent of testing in Canada may be unnecessary. 

Researchers stunned by rapid rate of erosion on Herschel Island

Researchers working on Herschel Island this summer say they witnessed rates of coastal erosion not seen in decades.

“Big chunks of soil and ground just breaking off. Then those chunks would fall into the waves and get eaten away by the waves every day,” said Isla Myers-Smith, a researcher based at the University of Edinburgh.

Herschel Island map

Herschel Island lies five kilometres off the north coast of Yukon in the Beaufort Sea. (CBC)

Coastal erosion isn’t new to the area, said Myers-Smith, who has been studying climate change on Herschel Island since 2008. But the land is disappearing this year at what could be unprecedented speed, she said.

Myers-Smith said large blocks of land the size of garden sheds were breaking off into the ocean near the historic Pauline Cove settlement, threatening the foundations of prehistoric sod houses and the remains of a 19th-century whaling colony.

Herschel Island contains some of the oldest buildings in Yukon.

Pauline Cove has 12 standing buildings dating back to 1893.

Pauline Cove

Erosion near the Pauline Cove settlement on Herschel Island. (Submitted by Isla Myers-Smith/Team Shrub)

The Yukon government’s manager of historic sites, Barb Hogan, said the parks branch began moving buildings in 2002 to protect them from erosion. Others have been raised.

“Currently one of the buildings, a warehouse, is still fairly close to the shoreline and when storms occur waves are lapping at its foundation,” said Hogan.

“So we’re looking at different ways to protect these historic buildings. We’re looking at ways to allow them to dry out between the storms. And looking at ways to see if we need to protect the shoreline,” she said.

Myers-Smith and her team were on the island for two months. She said the rapid erosion peaked in mid-July and then eased off.

Herschel Island Slump

An aerial shot of the slumping that happens on Herschel Island as underground ice melts and the earth turns to mud. (Andrew Cunliffe)

Her team used drone imagery to quantify what they had seen at ground level and it confirmed their belief that the erosion was rapid.

There’s not much that can be done to stop the erosion once it starts, Myers-Smith said.

“I think it’s something we just have to recognize about this area, these are sensitive permafrost environments, and when conditions change, disturbances can happen.

“It’s this magical place for me,” said Myers-Smith.

“When you’re standing along those coastlines, watching the waves crashing away, and eating away at the land underneath your feet. It’s pretty dramatic,” she said.

Her team will continue to monitor changes on the island.

Herschel Island Erosion

More of the erosion near Pauline Cove. (Submitted by Isla Myers-Smith/Team Shrub)

Winnipeg couple slams Walmart Canada Bank for not reversing $6,600 in fraudulent charges

A Winnipeg couple who say they were pickpocketed in Mexico are out $6,600 after someone apparently used the PIN on their credit card to make fraudulent purchases, and their credit card company says that’s enough reason to not reverse the charges.

Rick and Andree Jolicoeur were in Cancun in February when a routine bus trip to get groceries ended with him realizing his wallet had been stolen sometime during their travels.

Since then, they’ve been in a months-long fight with Walmart Canada Bank, which issued their MasterCard. The company says it won’t reverse the charges because it appears the person who used the card knew the four-digit PIN, and the cardholder agreement states a consumer must protect the code.

“If someone has a MasterCard, they won’t realize that this can happen to them — this is atrocious,” Rick Jolicoeur told CBC News.

“We did everything that we are supposed to do.”

Credit card PINs can be stolen

Frances Lawrence, who’s with the Credit Counselling Society, said a PIN can be stolen with the use of a pinhole camera at an ATM or other bank machines. Credit card information can be accessed using a device such a “shimmer” that fits inside a card reader and can be installed quickly by a criminal who slides it into the machine while pretending to make a purchase or withdrawal. 

Once installed, the microchips on the shimmer record information from chip cards, including the PIN.

“All of the information has to be stored somewhere,” she said. “Be vigilant and always make sure you know where your card is.”

The Jolicoeurs say they didn’t notice the wallet was missing until about two hours after they left their hotel, and when they tried to pay for groceries. 

They quickly made calls to their credit card companies, cancelling their Visa and MasterCard. Rick Jolicoeur said Visa had already flagged a suspicious double charge on his card and had put a hold on it.

His MasterCard had already racked up almost $7,000 in charges, including two of $3,300 from what he was later told was an “equipment rental” business. Rick Jolicoeur said the company told them to “enjoy their vacation” and “everything would be taken care of.”

After they returned to Winnipeg, they learned Walmart Canada Bank refused to reverse the charges.

Several phone calls to the call service centre revealed that because the card has a chip and the purchaser used the correct PIN to make the charge, Walmart Canada Bank was not liable. 

“[They] started accusing me of being in cahoots with the thieves and giving them my PIN and said I was basically a thief,” Rick Jolicoeur said.

“The blood was rushing up to here. I had to get off the phone.”

Walmart points to cardholder agreement

Walmart Canada Bank stands by its decision to not reverse the charges.

“Unfortunately many consumers believe they are fully insulated from credit card fraud. The fact is the cardholder agreement holds the account holder responsible for the protection of their PIN,” said spokesperson Alex Roberton in a prepared statement.

“The majority of fraudulent chip and PIN transactions are not reversed if a correct PIN is used, particularly on the first try.”

Jolicoeur admitted he never read his agreement, but wonders why the company doesn’t make this caveat clearer.

“They never ever tell that if your card is stolen and the PIN is used, you’re on the hook for it,” he said.

“It’ll take one time for this to happen to you and then it is all the sudden, buyer beware.”

Rick Jolicoeur said even his wife doesn’t know his PIN, so he can’t imagine how someone would have obtained it.

According to his bill, which was provided to CBC, the only other time he used the credit card that day was at the Walmart in Cancun. 

The couple said since the credit card controversy began in February, the first piece of written documentation they saw to explain why the charges weren’t reversed was the statement Walmart sent to CBC.

Roberton told CBC News that the Jolicoeurs have yet to request the documentation. The Jolicoeurs deny this claim, saying they have requested it in writing multiple times for insurance reasons. They have now turned to Walmart’s ombudsman — their last hope for getting the charges reversed.

According to Walmart Canada Bank’s customer complaint process, the company’s ombudsman undertakes an impartial review of unresolved customer complaints if they are not resolved within 90 days. 

‘Ensure you are protected’: Credit counsellor

Lawrence said the Jolicoeur family’s situation highlights why people need to protect their PIN and think twice when using a credit card while travelling.

“People aren’t always aware of what it is in their cardholder agreement and what they are covered for,” she told CBC News. Most agreements can be found online, she said.

“It is really important if you are using a credit card for travel to understand what you need to do if you are in the position that your card is compromised.”

Credit cards such as MasterCard may advertise the cardholder has “zero liability,” but it is not black and white, she said.

“There may be steps you need to take to ensure you are protected,” she said. “Knowing what you have to do to protect yourself is more important.”

Lawrence recommends that travellers:

  • Take a credit card with a lower limit.
  • Carry small amounts of cash to allow you to lock up the card in a safe at the hotel.
  • Always inform the credit card company when travelling out of the country.
  • Monitor charges to ensure there isn’t any strange activity.

“Everybody is going to be looking out for their best interest, so the most important thing is that you are aware of what that looks like [to a credit card company],” she said.

And always protect your PIN, added Lawrence.

Winnipeg couple slams Walmart for refusing to reverse $6,600 in fraudulent charges

A Winnipeg couple who say they were pickpocketed in Mexico are out $6,600 after someone apparently used the PIN on their credit card to make fraudulent purchases, and MasterCard says that’s enough reason to not reverse the charges.

Rick and Andree Jolicoeur were in Cancun in February when a routine bus trip to get groceries ended with him realizing his wallet had been stolen sometime during their travels.

Since then, they’ve been in a months-long fight with Walmart Canada Bank. The company says it won’t reverse the charges because it appears the person who used the card knew the four-digit PIN, and the cardholder agreement states a consumer must protect the code.

“If someone has a MasterCard, they won’t realize that this can happen to them — this is atrocious,” Rick Jolicoeur told CBC News.

“We did everything that we are supposed to do.”

Credit card PINs can be stolen

Frances Lawrence, who’s with the Credit Counselling Society, said a PIN can be stolen with the use of a pinhole camera at an ATM or other bank machines. Credit card information can be accessed using a device such a “shimmer” that fits inside a card reader and can be installed quickly by a criminal who slides it into the machine while pretending to make a purchase or withdrawal. 

Once installed, the microchips on the shimmer record information from chip cards, including the PIN.

“All of the information has to be stored somewhere,” she said. “Be vigilant and always make sure you know where your card is.”

The Jolicoeurs say they didn’t notice the wallet was missing until about two hours after they left their hotel, and when they tried to pay for groceries. 

They quickly made calls to their credit card companies, cancelling their Visa and MasterCard. Rick Jolicoeur said Visa had already flagged a suspicious double charge on his card and had put a hold on it.

His MasterCard had already racked up almost $7,000 in charges, including two of $3,300 from what he was later told was an “equipment rental” business. Rick Jolicoeur said the company told them to “enjoy their vacation” and “everything would be taken care of.”

After they returned to Winnipeg, they learned Walmart refused to reverse the charges.

Several phone calls to the call service centre revealed that because the card has a chip and the purchaser used the correct PIN to make the charge, Walmart was not liable. 

“[They] started accusing me of being in cahoots with the thieves and giving them my PIN and said I was basically a thief,” Rick Jolicoeur said.

“The blood was rushing up to here, I had to get off the phone.”

Walmart points to cardholder agreement

Walmart stands by its decision to not reverse the charges.

“Unfortunately many consumers believe they are fully insulated from credit card fraud. The fact is the cardholder agreement holds the account holder responsible for the protection of their PIN,” said spokesperson Alex Roberton in a prepared statement.

“The majority of fraudulent chip and PIN transactions are not reversed if a correct PIN is used, particularly on the first try.”

Jolicoeur admitted he never read his agreement, but wonders why the company doesn’t make this caveat more clear.

“They never ever tell that if your card is stolen and the PIN is used, you’re on the hook for it,” he said.

“It’ll take one time for this to happen to you and then it is all the sudden, buyer beware.”

Rick Jolicoeur said even his wife doesn’t know his PIN, so he can’t imagine how someone would have obtained it.

According to his bill, which was provided to CBC, the only other time he used the credit card that day was at the Walmart in Cancun. 

The couple said since the credit card controversy began in February, the first piece of written documentation they saw to explain why the charges weren’t reversed was the statement Walmart sent to CBC.

Roberton told CBC News that the Jolicoeurs have yet to request the documentation. The Jolicoeurs deny this claim, saying they have requested it in writing multiple times for insurance reasons. They have now turned to Walmart’s ombudsman — their last hope for getting the charges reversed.

According to Walmart’s customer complaint process, the company’s ombudsman undertakes an impartial review of unresolved customer complaints if they are not resolved within 90 days. 

‘Ensure you are protected’: Credit counsellor

Lawrence said the Jolicoeur family’s situation highlights why people need to protect their PIN and think twice when using a credit card while travelling.

“People aren’t always aware of what it is in their cardholder agreement and what they are covered for,” she told CBC News. Most agreements can be found online, she said.

“It is really important if you are using a credit card for travel to understand what you need to do if you are in the position that your card is compromised.”

Credit cards such as MasterCard may advertise the cardholder has “zero liability,” but it is not black and white, she said.

“There may be steps you need to take to ensure you are protected,” she said. “Knowing what you have to do to protect yourself is more important.”

Lawrence recommends that travellers:

  • Take a credit card with a lower limit.
  • Carry small amounts of cash to allow you to lock up the card in a safe at the hotel.
  • Always inform the credit card company when travelling out of the country.
  • Monitor charges to ensure there isn’t any strange activity.

“Everybody is going to be looking out for their best interest, so the most important thing is that you are aware of what that looks like [to a credit card company],” she said.

And always protect your PIN, added Lawrence.

Climate change ‘sleeping giant’ challenge for fishery, says ocean researcher

An ocean scientist says climate change is making it increasingly harder for governments to manage their fisheries.

‘Fish are going to move, and food webs are going to change.’ – Brett Favaro

Brett Favaro, a research scientist at Memorial University’s of Newfoundland’s Fisheries and Marine Institute, has written a new book called The Carbon Code.

It’s been described as a how-to guide to help the average person do their part to lessen the effects of climate change.

The ‘sleeping giant’

Through his research on the Newfoundland and Labrador fishery, Favaro said he found a “sleeping giant” when it comes to climate change that he feels isn’t getting enough attention.

“A lot of people don’t realize that the impacts of climate change on the ocean are going to be as or more severe than the impacts of climate change that we’re going to experience on land,” he told the St. John’s Morning Show.

“For a province like ours that relies on the ocean, this is kind of a scary thing.”

4 horsemen of the ocean apocalypse

In The Carbon Code, Favaro describes what he calls the four horsemen of the ocean apocalypse: rising temperatures, increased depth, elevated acidity and reduced oxygen.

He said those four things working together can completely change the chemistry of the ocean, which spells trouble for the food web that exists for the animals that live there.

shrimp fishery

Favaro says managing fisheries are going to get increasingly harder as food webs are affected by changing chemistry in the world’s oceans. (CBC)

Favaro said even small changes to those food webs can make the fishery very unpredictable and even harder to build policy around.

“You can manage the fisheries as well as you like but if the whole ocean changes, then you have a serious problem,” he said.

“Fish are going to move, and food webs are going to change and so we have to be extra careful with the way we manage our fisheries.”

While climate change’s effect on the oceans is what keeps him awake at night, Favaro said what gets him out of bed every morning is the fact that there are good things happening with regard to changing how people pollute.

Encouraging better behaviour

Favaro hopes to help people take steps towards reducing their own carbon footprint and then showing them how they can help others do the same.

A big part of that is getting people who are skeptical about climate change to embrace climate-friendly policies for other reasons.

For example, he said a mayoral candidate may deny that climate change is real, but he said that same candidate would no doubt support better public transit systems and more walking trails. He said finding that common ground is what can move policy in the right direction.

“The good news is, things that are good for climate tend to be things that are good for you, for your city and for your economy as well,” he said.

“I want to get people off the couch and into the fight.”